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Android Schmandroid: Old iPhones, iPads Smoke New Rivals

Clearly, price is a factor here. Most new smartphones sell for $200 or more. But at the same time, it shows the power of Apple, which can sell a two-year-old device as well, or better, than other companies can sell new offerings.

Craig Galbraith

May 10, 2011

1 Min Read
Android Schmandroid: Old iPhones, iPads Smoke New Rivals

Android has taken the world by storm. Just about all of the research out there shows the operating system is now the market-share leader among smartphones in the U.S., and its making big strides globally as well. But a new report shows Apples iPhone isnt getting kicked to the curb.

Apple has maintained its market share about 25 percent over the past few quarters as Android primarily has stolen customers away from RIMs BlackBerry and other operating systems. And remember, while Apple only offers one smartphone, there are dozens of Android choices out there, some of which are selling well, and others that arent.

Apples one device is still faring quite well, according to a new report from analyst Michael Walkley of Canaccord Genuity. In fact, customers who are taking advantage of pricing for Apples third-generation iPhone (3G S) just $49 are helping it outsell brand-new Android offerings. Walkley says a check of retail outlets shows the old iPhone is beating new offerings from HTC and Motorola: the Inspire and Atrix, respectively.

Clearly, price is a factor here. Most new smartphones sell for $200 or more. But at the same time, it shows the power of Apple, which can sell a two-year-old device as well, or better, than other companies can sell new offerings. Success of the 3G S might keep Apple from rushing an iPhone 5 to market, a release most expect wont happen until fall at the earliest.

The iPhone isnt the only old” device success for Apple. Walkley says the original iPad is selling better than many Android counterparts since the iPad 2 became available in March. Apple reduced the price of the original iPad the tablet market leader by $100 when the second-generation device went on sale.

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About the Author(s)

Craig Galbraith

Editorial Director, Channel Futures

Craig Galbraith is the editorial director for Channel Futures and Channel Partners, joining the team in 2008. Before that, he spent more than 11 years as an anchor, reporter and managing editor in television newsrooms in North Dakota and Washington state. Craig is a proud Husky, having graduated from the University of Washington. He makes his home in the Phoenix area.

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