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Ubuntu: Showing Signs of Server Momentum?

As Ubuntu 10.04's debut approaches in April 2010, the hype has started: Plenty of folks are writing the usual Ubuntu vs. Windows or Ubuntu vs. Mac OS X stories. But another theme is emerging, and it involves Canonical's Ubuntu Server Edition and Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud (UEC) strategies -- both of which are showing some momentum. Here's why. Of course, I need to preface this blog with three key points:

Joe Panettieri

March 24, 2010

2 Min Read
Ubuntu: Showing Signs of Server Momentum?

As Ubuntu 10.04’s debut approaches in April 2010, the hype has started: Plenty of folks are writing the usual Ubuntu vs. Windows or Ubuntu vs. Mac OS X stories. But another theme is emerging, and it involves Canonical’s Ubuntu Server Edition and Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud (UEC) strategies — both of which are showing some momentum. Here’s why.

Of course, I need to preface this blog with three key points:

  1. Red Hat remains dominate in the Linux server market. The company announced another strong financial quarter today, and Red Hat’s momentum seems to be accelerating across Linux, JBoss middleware and virtualization.

  2. Despite a potential takeover debate, Novel is showing some more SUSE Linux momentum. At this week’s Novell BrainShare conference, many ISVs stood up and applauded Novell’s SUSE Linux software appliance strategy.

  3. Canonical is an upstart in the server and cloud markets, where most of the noise involves entrenched IT giants or disruptive players like VMware.

Now, The Good News

All that aside, Canonical has reason to smile today. The reason: Dell has announced plans to support Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud (UEC), which is based upon the Eucalyptus Systems cloud platform. Also of note: Canonical has revealed the results of its annual Ubuntu server study. The most pressing finding: A full 72 percent of participants say they consider Ubuntu robust enough for mission critical services.

Where will Canonical head next? The company has been busy lining up independent software vendors (ISVs) to support Ubuntu Server Edition 10.04. Also, Canonical is working on a software appliance strategy — which allows ISVs and customers to more quickly deploy specific applications. Rival Novell has shown some momentum with its SUSE Studio and SUSE Linux Appliance efforts.

Of course, there’s plenty more work to be done. Hewlett-Packard and IBM have shown only passing interest in Ubuntu Server Edition. And major ISVs like Oracle have yet to port their applications to the operating system.

But it’s safe to say Ubuntu Server Edition’s glass is half full, thanks to the growing Dell relationship.

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About the Author(s)

Joe Panettieri

Former Editorial Director, Nine Lives Media, a division of Penton Media

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